Submitting Work

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When you submit work to the editor, attach your write-up as a word document. You may not be a big Micorsoft fan, that's ok, but there are a few features in Word, that speed up the editing process. If you don't have access to Word, just attach it as a plain text file (.txt).


Use an easy to read font...something like Arial or Times New Roman. Fancy fonts are sometimes difficult to read, and we want to make the editing process as easy as possible. Also, use the same font all the way through your submission. And besides, once your write-up is published to the site, the standard website font will be used.


Use the appropriate template from the templates forum. You don't have to follow it exactly, but a template will help you submit a complete write-up, and reinforce continuity of all published work.


Make sure your submission is ready to be submitted to the editors before you submit it. In other words, don't submit sloppy work. Use a spell checker...there are a number of them on the web. Read it aloud to yourself three times...you'll be surprised at how many errors this prevents. You can also have a friend read it.

Language

Use American English for spelling. For example: use center and not centre, airplane and not aeroplane, meter and not metre, etc...

Time

Use the 12-hour clock for measuring time (3:41 pm), and use a lower case am/pm with no periods following. For measuring time duration use second, minute, hour, day, week, month, year, decade, century, and millenium.

Punctuation

Use punctuation inside parentheses when the sentence contained is complete e.g. (The ship orbited Mars.) Not: (The ship orbited Mars). Also notice the first word is capitalized when a complete sentence is used. This is also correct: We turned on the slip-space generator (a device that enables you to stay in slip-space) before we entered the gate.


In a sentence containing a parenthetical expression, any punctuation belonging to the main sentence goes outside the parentheses. Example: The import manifold was hot (over 650°)! And. We went to Earth, Luna(Earth's moon), and Mars yesterday.


Put commas and periods within closing quotation marks, except when a parenthetical reference follows the quotation. Example: "Quite down," he said. "And keep your hands off." Also: She said, "It's time to go."

Numbers

When using single digit numbers spell them out. Instead of (1,2,3...9) use (one, two, three...nine). The exception is when using numbers that have units after them—use digit space abbreviation. Examples: 1 kg, 3 gee, six people, and 55 years.

Paragraphs and indenting

Paragraphs help the reader follow a story more easily, especially on an web-document. Double space when starting a new paragraph to put some white space between blocks of text, and start a new paragraph when there is a change of place, change of time, change of topic, or the speaker changes.

Publication dates

Don't put your publishing dates on your work. Keep this documentation stored securely at home, to help prevent someone from stealing your work.

Emphasis

Don't use ALL CAPS to add special emphasis to a piece of work. If the particular piece of writing is done correctly, there is no need to emphasize in this manner—the piece will just stick out on its own. The same goes for a repeated or bolded word. Make your writing stand out on its own. This is not to say that you cannot use ALLCAPS or repeated words in writing. Eric Nylund used it effectively in the Halo series when he depicted several lines of text scrolling down the teleprompter. Repeated words can also work well if used for effect instead of emphasis. Jan’s eyes teared up as the fingers of her assailant squeezed tightly around her throat. “Stop stop stop”, her vocal chords squeaked as she tried to scream out with her last breath.

Capitalization

Capitalize the first word of a sentence. He emerged from the slip-gate. Capitalize a proper noun. The Milky Way Galaxy is our home. Capitalize a person's title when it precedes the name. Do not capitalize when the title is acting as a description following the name. Senator Grax is the senator for the Sol system. Capitalize points of the compass only when they refer to specific regions. She came from the South, but if you want to find the ship, turn west at the next block. After a sentence ending with a colon, do not capitalize the first word if it begins a list. These are my favorite weapons: blaster, knife, and mine.

Units of Measure

Use the metric system for all measurements. Check the table below for the proper roots and prefixes. The measurements of temperature (Celsius & Kelvin) do not use the prefixes.

base unit	Symbol	Quantity	 
meter	m	length	 
kilogram	kg	mass	 
second	s	time	 
ampere	A	electric current	 
kelvin	K	thermodynamic temp	 
mole mol	amount of substance	 
candela cd	luminous intensity	 
	 	 	 
	 	 	 
derived units	Symbol	Quantity	Formula
liter	L	Volume	1 L = 1 dm3
newton	N	force	1 N = 1(kg * m)/s2
pascal	Pa	pressure/stress	1 Pa = N/m2
watt	W	rate of energy use	1 W = 1 J/s
joule	J	work done	1 J = 1 N * m
volt	V	wave difference	(kg * m2)/(A * s3)
coulomb C	Charge	1 C = 1 A * 1 S
	 	 	 
	 	 	 
other units	Symbol	Quantity	Formula
Celsius	 	temperature	[K] - 273.15
byte	 	data storage	 
hertz	Hz	wave frequency	 
gee	 	gravitational force
   
     
yotta-	Y	1024	1000000000000000000000000
zetta-	Z	1021	1000000000000000000000
exa-	E	1018	1000000000000000000
peta-	P	1015	1000000000000000
tera-	T	1012	1000000000000
giga-	G	109	1000000000
mega-	M	106	1000000
kilo-	k	103	1000
hecto-	h	102	100
deka-	da	101	10
	 	100	1
deci-	d	10-1	-10
centi-	c	10-2	-100
milli-	m	10-3	-1000
micro-	µ       10-6	-1000000
nano-	n	10-9	-1000000000
pico-	p	10-12	-1000000000000
femto-	f	10-15	-1000000000000000
atto-	a	10-18	-1000000000000000000
zepto-	z	10-21	-1000000000000000000000
yocto-	y	10-24	-1000000000000000000000000